This is a trade facing website. Visit the ACTís consumer site thecyclingexperts.co.uk for information and advice on cycling and find your local independent cycle retailer.
The Association of Cycle Traders
This is a trade facing website.
Visit the ACTís consumer site at thecyclingexperts.co.uk.

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Results: 1-10 of 1747


19 Jul 2019

At the beginning of July ATG Training visited Scotland to carry out a number of Cytech technical two assessments, enabling experienced bike mechanics living and working there to gain the...

4 Jul 2019

The annual search to find Britain’s Best Small Shop, a competition managed by the Independent Retailers Confederation (IRC), begins today with a focus on consumer engagement and how...

25 Jun 2019

The plans for a new Thames walking and cycling crossing from Canary Wharf to Rotherhithe in London have been halted due to the rising costs

25 Jun 2019

Survival has been the primary focus of many bike shops, but what if you are looking to grow?

24 Jun 2019

Local Bike Shop Day celebrates independent bike shops all around the UK

24 Jun 2019

New research estimates the effect of e-bikes on miles travelled and greenhouse gas emissions

20 Jun 2019

The definitive guide to safer cycling is a four part series that offers crucial information on important cycling safety statistics as well as helpful tips and advice

12 Jun 2019

The Government recently announced the introduction of e-bikes into the Cycle to Work scheme. The addition of e-bike within the Cycle to Work scheme could help more commuters turn to greener...

12 Jun 2019

The e-bike market is forecasted to grow further across the UK competing with the car for short distances.

12 Jun 2019

The APPCG hope you can join their next meeting on the industrial case for cycling

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Cycling to work can significantly lower your stress levels, shows study

Posted on in Cycles News

A recent study suggests cycling to the office can help reduce stress and improve your work performance.

Specialist cycle insurance from CycleguardResearchers Stephane Brutus, Roshan Javadian and Alexandra Panaccio compared how different modes of commuting - cycling, driving a car and taking public transport - affected stress and mood at work.

Its results indicate that cycling to work is a good way to have a good day, says Brutus, the lead author. "Employees who cycled to work showed significantly lower levels of stress within the first 45 minutes of work than those who travelled by car," he says. The study did not, however, find any difference in the effect on mood. The research team collected data from employees at an information technology company in Old Montreal, using a web-based survey. Respondents replied to questions about their mood, perceived commuting stress and mode of travel.

The survey differentiated between perceived stress and mood, a more transient state affected by personality traits and emotions. The study only assessed answers from respondents who had completed the questionnaire within 45 minutes of arriving at work.

This was done to get a more ‘in-the-moment' assessment of employees' stress and mood. Brutus notes that this time specification was the study's major innovation. "Recent research has shown that early morning stress and mood are strong predictors of their effect later in the day," he explains. "They can shape how subsequent events are perceived, interpreted and acted upon for the rest of the day."

He adds that the time specification ensured a more precise picture of stress upon arrival at work. Retrospective assessments can be coloured by stressors that occur later in the workday. "There are relatively few studies that compare the affective experiences of cyclists with those of car and public transport users," says Brutus, an avid cyclist himself. "Our study was an attempt to address that gap." At the same time, the team confirmed previous research that found that cyclists perceived their commute as being less stressful than those who travelled by car.

Cycling has been shown to be a relatively inexpensive mode of transportation and a good form of physical activity. A 2015 study from the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy found that cycling could help reduce CO2 emissions from urban passenger transportation by 11% by 2050. Brutus points out that 6% of Canadians cycled to work in 2011 and the number is only growing. There is potential for public policy makers to seize on this, he adds. "With growing concerns about traffic congestion and pollution, governments are increasingly promoting non-motorized alternative modes of transport, such as walking and cycling.

I can only hope that further studies will follow our lead and develop more precise and deliberate research into this phenomenon." The study was published in the International Journal of Workplace Health Management.

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