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19 Oct 2021

This is the £200 threshold that determines the response by the police, and theft below this level does not always merit a police visit and offenders can plead guilty by post.

19 Oct 2021

The FCA have recently announced significant increases in their base ratefees that will have an unfavourable effect, particularly on smaller independent retailers.

18 Oct 2021

Cycling Industry News has announced the launch of its 2022 Market Data drive and once again invites UK-based independent bike retailers to participate.

18 Oct 2021

#BikeIsBest,the cycle industry campaign supported by leading brands, retailers, organisations and cycling advocacy groups, has launched its latest campaign: When more people cycle,...

18 Oct 2021

The All Party Parliamentary Group for Cycling & Walking (APPGCW) have an upcoming meeting on Monday the 18th October focussing on initiatives to promote walking

14 Oct 2021

Originally due to end on 31 December 2021, it has since been announced (4th October 2021) that the scheme has been extended until March 2022.

13 Oct 2021

Cytech continues to be in record-breaking demand as it now sees the highest ever number of technicians certified within one month in September 2021 - with over 115 in the UK alone!

13 Oct 2021

According to UK Finance, 'The new £100 limit is designed to balance security, convenience and consumer demand."

11 Oct 2021

With current incentives andfunding grants in place employers taking on new apprentices could receive up to £4,000 per apprentice.

11 Oct 2021

Your Business Journey to Net Zero, is a series of locally focused virtual events, designed to help small businesses who want to play theirpart in climate change, but don't know where is best...

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Cycling to work can significantly lower your stress levels, shows study

Posted on in Cycles News

A recent study suggests cycling to the office can help reduce stress and improve your work performance.

Specialist cycle insurance from CycleguardResearchers Stephane Brutus, Roshan Javadian and Alexandra Panaccio compared how different modes of commuting - cycling, driving a car and taking public transport - affected stress and mood at work.

Its results indicate that cycling to work is a good way to have a good day, says Brutus, the lead author. "Employees who cycled to work showed significantly lower levels of stress within the first 45 minutes of work than those who travelled by car," he says. The study did not, however, find any difference in the effect on mood. The research team collected data from employees at an information technology company in Old Montreal, using a web-based survey. Respondents replied to questions about their mood, perceived commuting stress and mode of travel.

The survey differentiated between perceived stress and mood, a more transient state affected by personality traits and emotions. The study only assessed answers from respondents who had completed the questionnaire within 45 minutes of arriving at work.

This was done to get a more ‘in-the-moment' assessment of employees' stress and mood. Brutus notes that this time specification was the study's major innovation. "Recent research has shown that early morning stress and mood are strong predictors of their effect later in the day," he explains. "They can shape how subsequent events are perceived, interpreted and acted upon for the rest of the day."

He adds that the time specification ensured a more precise picture of stress upon arrival at work. Retrospective assessments can be coloured by stressors that occur later in the workday. "There are relatively few studies that compare the affective experiences of cyclists with those of car and public transport users," says Brutus, an avid cyclist himself. "Our study was an attempt to address that gap." At the same time, the team confirmed previous research that found that cyclists perceived their commute as being less stressful than those who travelled by car.

Cycling has been shown to be a relatively inexpensive mode of transportation and a good form of physical activity. A 2015 study from the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy found that cycling could help reduce CO2 emissions from urban passenger transportation by 11% by 2050. Brutus points out that 6% of Canadians cycled to work in 2011 and the number is only growing. There is potential for public policy makers to seize on this, he adds. "With growing concerns about traffic congestion and pollution, governments are increasingly promoting non-motorized alternative modes of transport, such as walking and cycling.

I can only hope that further studies will follow our lead and develop more precise and deliberate research into this phenomenon." The study was published in the International Journal of Workplace Health Management.

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